Inclusive Language and the NIV 2011

Talk about cutting off your nose to spite your face, check out Rod Decker’s post: Wayne Grudem’s use of inclusive language. Be sure and read the comments (warning: for the comments, put on your technical grammar hat!). Especially see Decker’s comment:

The detractors [of the NIV 2011] have lists

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Why Christian Hedonism? or How to Refute a Stoic

Paul Helm, emminent philosopher and theologian, has a great piece on John Piper’s Christian hedonism and some reflections on The Pastor as Scholar, the Scholar as Pastor. Here’s how he concludes:

The alternative to adopting Piper’s hedonism is not to become Stoics. Augustine said: I refute Stoicism with two

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Erasing Hell

Keep in mind that we’re not simply trying to settle a doctrinal issue. We’re talking about people’s destinies. The thought that someone may end up banking on a second chance after they die even though the biblical authors never explicitly said this is … well …
Terrifying.

These are eternal

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Blomberg on the Updated NIV

Craig Blomberg has some important insights on why the updated NIV is the best rendering of Matthew 5:32. He writes:

The updated NIV nicely captures the passive sense with its “makes her the victim of adultery.” It is also the first major English translation to do so.

See his Victims Read More ⇒

What Are You Doing This Weekend?

Male Headship: What God Does Not Say

Key Questions about Christian Faith: Old Testament Answers by John Goldingay is a valuable collection of essays that are broad in scope touching on everything from tithing and circumcision to prayer and suffering. One essay caught my attention and suggests a cautious hermeneutic when seeking to find timeless principles from Read More ⇒

Jesus as Temple

A few days ago a car wash attendant saw the book Jesus the Temple in my hand and enthusiastically queried, “Hey, is that a book about Jesus?” I said, “Well, yes. It’s about the Jewish temple showing Jesus as a kind of new temple. It also highlights the historical, cultural, Read More ⇒

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