The argument for God’s existence from objective moral values states that some things are really wrong in themselves, not because society says so or because some human choices may be inherently helpful in survival while others are harmful. Abuse, rape, and child torture are really wrong and not just sociallyRead More

With Easter upon us it’s a fine time to look again at the “other” option so many so sadly seem to find attractive: R-E-I-N-C-A-R-N-A-T-I-O-N. When talking with your non-believing neighbor, co-worker, friend, etc., why not bring up the subject of life after death, expose the concerns of reincarnation, and showRead More

Don’t miss this new blog and debate where two giants of philosophical thought and rhetorical ability engage the biggest question of all time. William Lane Craig, Ph.D., D. Phil., is one of the world’s leading philosophers of religion and holds the position of Research Professor at Talbot School of TheologyRead More

Os Guinness writes in Time for Truth: The discipline of living in truth is urgent today because modern life reduces community and accountability to its thinnest, thereby tempting us to live in a shadow world of anonymity and nonresponsibility where all cats are gray. In such a world, becoming peopleRead More

The Logic of Hope

Modus ponens is a basic, valid argument form. Typically, it consists of a conditional premise, a second premise that asserts the antecedent of the first premise (i.e., the “if…” clause”), and a conclusion that asserts the consequent (the fulfillment of the conditional clause in the first premise). Its formula runs thusly,Read More

A Brief Treatise on Inspiration, Infallability, and Inerrancy

At the outset it’s necessary to define some terms that are are thrown around rather loosely in Christian circles, such as “inspiration,” “inerrancy,” and “infallability,” and zero in more precisely what they mean. As is well known, 2 Timothy 3:16 tells us that “all Scripture is inspired by God [literally, “God-breathed”].” The term “inspired” more precisely connotes expiration rather than inspiration, since the source of Scripture is God and he “breathed out,” as it were, the content of Scripture. The mode by which he chose to communicate was, of course, human agency, but without displacing the writer’s peculiar style, background, personality, et al. In so far as copies were faithfully reproduced from the original manuscripts, truthfulness and accuracy was preserved in the text. Read More