Over the years I have been exposed to different kinds of pastoring. One is a practical side that is typically less rigorous academically, while another shows diligent academic interests with only some application. As a result of these disparate models, a series of questions have come up around the roleContinue Reading

Carmen Imes and Dru Johnson discuss what the imago Dei (image of God) is and is not. Speaking especially from the text of Genesis, some important insights are made. This is an excellent primer to Carmen’s upcoming release,  Being God’s Image: Why Creation Still Matters. The podcast also sheds lightContinue Reading

God is sovereign over salvation. Humans are responsible in salvation. These two truths are the hallmarks of the doctrine of election in the Gospel according to John. It is admit­ted that there is a certain evasiveness to sovereignty and responsibility when both are held to be true. Nevertheless, for John,Continue Reading

For those culture warriors (think, “Wayne Grudem”) who argue against PC-versions of the Bible and insist ‘essentially literal’ is always a superior translation, check out “When evangelical snowflakes censor the Bible: The English Standard Version goes PC: How a Bible edition aimed at right-wing evangelicals has quietly scrubbed references to slaveryContinue Reading

In Matthew 22:36-39 Jesus tells us love is the highest duty of humankind. Love is human activity at its finest.

The command is the same in both cases: to love; but the recipients are different: “God” and “neighbor” (see Deuteronomy 6:5; Leviticus 19:18; and likely Luke 10:29-37 where “neighbor” extends to anyone in need). Since God is the greater of the two recipients (greater in every way morally, metaphysically, and conceptually), then it follows that he must receive more of our love. In fact, God must receive all of our love. Neighbors, however, are to receive at least as much as …Continue Reading

Sandra Richter’s book is difficult. Not intellectually, mind you. Far worse. It’s ethically demanding because it’s an eye-opening portrayal of God’s call for environmental responsibility. It addresses issues only the courageous will consider, but all are called on to engage. The concerns of creation care are not just critical, political, structural; they are ubiquitous. On every page this book is a biblical, practical, and down-to-earth call to action. Readers are not only informed about Scripture’s clear message of environmental stewardship, but challenged to make a difference. Richter’s purpose for writing Stewards of Eden: What Scripture Says About the Environment and Why It Matters is to provide a “biblical theology of environmental stewardship.” It is not overly technical and is especially …Continue Reading

In Paul and the Hope of GloryPaul and the Hope of Glory: An Exegetical and Theological Study Constantine Campbell has provided a significant and important contribution to eschatology from the writings of Paul the Apostle. What follows is just a teaser of “things to come” intended to provide some scaffolding for readers to stand upon as they work through this outstanding offering.

The book is divided into three parts with Part 1 (chapters 1-2) presenting introductory matters; Part 2 (chapters 3-13) providing a brief exegesis of relevant texts; Part 3 (chapters 14-18) integrating …Continue Reading