In Matthew 22:36-39 Jesus tells us love is the highest duty of humankind. Love is human activity at its finest.

The command is the same in both cases: to love; but the recipients are different: “God” and “neighbor” (see Deuteronomy 6:5; Leviticus 19:18; and likely Luke 10:29-37 where “neighbor” extends to anyone in need). Since God is the greater of the two recipients (greater in every way morally, metaphysically, and conceptually), then it follows that he must receive more of our love. In fact, God must receive all of our love. Neighbors, however, are to receive at least as much as …[ continue reading ]

In Paul and the Hope of GloryPaul and the Hope of Glory: An Exegetical and Theological Study Constantine Campbell has provided a significant and important contribution to eschatology from the writings of Paul the Apostle. What follows is just a teaser of “things to come” intended to provide some scaffolding for readers to stand upon as they work through this outstanding offering.

The book is divided into three parts with Part 1 (chapters 1-2) presenting introductory matters; Part 2 (chapters 3-13) providing a brief exegesis of relevant texts; Part 3 (chapters 14-18) integrating …[ continue reading ]

Icons of Christ: A Biblical and Systematic Theology for Women’s Ordination is a compelling and capable defense of women sharing the full sweep of responsibilities for leadership in the Church. Despite the contention this topic breeds and the heat it generates, each chapter fairly and charitably rehearses arguments for and against women serving in church leadership. Author William G. Witt rigorously engages all the relevant biblical texts, along with traditional and contemporary testimony from Catholic and Protestant opposing voices. With philosophical and theological acumen, Witt applies careful historical, theological, literary, and exegetical analyses throughout, while keeping a practical focus on the Church.

Since the breadth and depth of this book is large, …[ continue reading ]

To say Reading While Black by Esau McCaulley is large would be an understatement. No less than 10 days after its initial release (September 1, 2020) the publisher’s site notifies customers that shipments will be delayed due to high demand. The author has appeared on countless virtual interviews and is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times (see here). Already there have been numerous ratings given and reviews written;[ continue reading ]

Or, why it’s important to listen to Scripture and not import our own ideas into the text. The first rule in interpreting any text, ancient or contemporary, is listen to the author and learn what is being communicated. Enjoy this short video, then check out this post, “Interpreting the Bible, Nursery Rhymes, or Just About Anything Else“.[ continue reading ]

For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. Romans 3:23 With these words the Apostle Paul succinctly and poignantly “sums up the human tragedy” and his argument set out in Romans 1:18-3:20 (Morris, Romans, p 176). Sin levels the playing field. Sin is the common ground shared by every person resulting in a compromised moral standing before a morally perfect God. Whether “πάντες,” translated “all” is[ continue reading ]