I really enjoyed Ben Myers’s The Apostles’ Creed: A Guide to the Ancient Catechism. The subtitle is apt. As a “guide” it captures precisely the book’s scope where each chapter (just a few pages) is devoted to a single line (or word) from the creed. And yet it is packedRead More

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The third edition of Discovering Biblical Equality: Biblical, Theological, Cultural, and Practical Perspectives is now available and this volume is stacked with scholars who affirm, without reservation, the inspiration and authority of Scripture. This is a “fresh, positive defense of gender equality [and] at once scholarly and practical, irenic yetRead More

The Gospel Precisely: Surprisingly Good News about Jesus Christ the King is a small book with large insights on the message that is central to Christianity. It provides needed corrections to some of the classic expressions used when presenting the good news. The book chips away at the “thick wall ofRead More

Gregg Ten Elshof has done it again. He has written an especially helpful and deeply insightful book proposing that we would do well not to dismiss shame altogether. This book is highly accessible, deserves wide attention, and would make an outstanding resource for group discussion. For Shame: Rediscovering the VirtuesRead More

Craig A. Boyd & Kevin Timpe have provided an outstanding introduction to The Virtues in Oxford’s “Very Short Introductions” series. As with the other volumes, The Virtues is an excellent offering. It is clear and uncomplicated, thorough and inclusive in approach, and helpfully outlined and organized throughout.  Chapter 1 sets theRead More

History scholar Kristin Kobes Du Mez rehearses the ingredients of a distinctly American evangelical culture. Like it or not, these ingredients promote or facilitate nationalism, racism, sexism, white maleness, authority, and political power. She argues (convincingly) that a “militant white evangelicalism thrives on a sense of embattlement” (p xviii). ForRead More

Tish Harrison Warren offers important insight into what appears to be an inescapable predicament. Here’s the issue: In the throes of real pain and genuine suffering, we struggle to make sense out of the goodness of God (assuming there is some sense to be made under such pressure). This predicament favors no one and applies to everyone, whether …Read More

Not a little ink has spilled over the centuries and not a few words have been spoken to date on what it means for humans to be created in the image of God. I’ve written before on the imago Dei and, though brief, the sum of my thinking goes like this:

The Bible declares that humanity is created after the image and likeness of the Creator (Genesis 1:26). Humanity is the created representation of God on earth and redeemed humanity reflects the image of Christ (2 Corinthians 3:18; Colossians 3:10; Romans 8:29; 1 John 3:2). However, the image is a copy of the original, not the exact replica.

Furthermore, both male and female together …Read More

Sandra Richter’s book is difficult. Not intellectually, mind you. Far worse. It’s ethically demanding because it’s an eye-opening portrayal of God’s call for environmental responsibility. It addresses issues only the courageous will consider, but all are called on to engage. The concerns of creation care are not just critical, political, structural; they are ubiquitous. On every page this book is a biblical, practical, and down-to-earth call to action. Readers are not only informed about Scripture’s clear message of environmental stewardship, but challenged to make a difference. Richter’s purpose for writing Stewards of Eden: What Scripture Says About the Environment and Why It Matters is to provide a “biblical theology of environmental stewardship.” It is not overly technical and is especially …Read More