The following remarks were offered while teaching a course for Holy Trinity Anglican Church using Confessing the Faith, chapter 7, “The Work of Christ” in which Articles II, IV, and XXXI of the Thirty-Nine Articles are addressed. First, the last part of Article II says Christ “… truly suffered, was crucified, dead, andRead More

I had the opportunity, unexpectedly, to teach an adult class on the Trinity at our church this week. Here are my notes that I jotted down. The Bible affirms the reality of one God who eternally exists in three persons — Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. We take this to beRead More

I’ve put together a snapshot of many of the Christological heresies that the Christian Church had to contend with in the first several centuries of its existence. Altough other heresies are not mentioned (e.g., Sabellianism, Montanism), this matrix captures errant beliefs on the person and nature of Jesus Christ and the orthodox responses. Century/ErrorRead More

Delighting in the Trinity is subtitled “An Introduction to the Christian Faith” for a reason. Michael Reeves has done a superb job of taking an often complicated yet absolutely foundational doctrine of the Christian faith and made it accessible and personal. From start to finish, the author insists that theRead More

Joy and Human Flourishing: Essays on Theology, Culture, and the Good Life contains essays by Jürgen Moltmann, N. T. Wright, Marianne Meye Thompson, Mary Clark Moschella, Charles Mathewes, and Miroslav Volf. It ties joy with other biblical themes such as ecclesiology, happiness, pastoral counseling, creation, and, of course, suffering. The followingRead More

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Timothy C. Tennent, President of Asbury Theological Seminary has a series of brief posts that provide important insights from the late Pope John Paul II and his Theology of the Body. Each entry from Tennent prompts serious reflection about how we conceive of our material presence here on this earth. Below areRead More

The last installment of Perichoresis and Personhood: God, Christ, and Salvation in John of Damascus focuses upon “Perichoresis and Salvation” (the chapter title). In my previous post I noted how Twombly shows that perichoresis was explicitly used by John of Damascus to illustrate “how three might be one and how both variety andRead More

Setting the stage for the second chapter “Perichoresis and Christ”, Twombly begins by describing the “genuine advances” in christological development since Chalcedon (pp 48-53). I have to say that those already familiar with Chalcedonian (451 CE) and its import will readily find these few pages a gold mine of Christian history and worth the price of theRead More