As pandemic restrictions continue, members of the Society of Christian Philosophers were asked a few months ago to provide suggestions on ways to bring their content to a wider audience. In addition to their first-rate journal Faith & Philosophy, I suggested they consider adding a YouTube channel to reach a broader audience. Now this resource is available so …[ continue reading ]

Sandra Richter’s book is difficult. Not intellectually, mind you. Far worse. It’s ethically demanding because it’s an eye-opening portrayal of God’s call for environmental responsibility. It addresses issues only the courageous will consider, but all are called on to engage. The concerns of creation care are not just critical, political, structural; they are ubiquitous. On every page this book is a biblical, practical, and down-to-earth call to action. Readers are not only informed about Scripture’s clear message of environmental stewardship, but challenged to make a difference. Richter’s purpose for writing Stewards of Eden: What Scripture Says About the Environment and Why It Matters is to provide a “biblical theology of environmental stewardship.” It is not overly technical and is especially …[ continue reading ]

In Paul and the Hope of GloryPaul and the Hope of Glory: An Exegetical and Theological Study Constantine Campbell has provided a significant and important contribution to eschatology from the writings of Paul the Apostle. What follows is just a teaser of “things to come” intended to provide some scaffolding for readers to stand upon as they work through this outstanding offering.

The book is divided into three parts with Part 1 (chapters 1-2) presenting introductory matters; Part 2 (chapters 3-13) providing a brief exegesis of relevant texts; Part 3 (chapters 14-18) integrating …[ continue reading ]

Icons of Christ: A Biblical and Systematic Theology for Women’s Ordination is a compelling and capable defense of women sharing the full sweep of responsibilities for leadership in the Church. Despite the contention this topic breeds and the heat it generates, each chapter fairly and charitably rehearses arguments for and against women serving in church leadership. Author William G. Witt rigorously engages all the relevant biblical texts, along with traditional and contemporary testimony from Catholic and Protestant opposing voices. With philosophical and theological acumen, Witt applies careful historical, theological, literary, and exegetical analyses throughout, while keeping a practical focus on the Church.

Since the breadth and depth of this book is large, …[ continue reading ]

In his classic Confessions (Book X), Augustine prays, “Give what Thou commandest, and command what Thou willest.”

Some say that God never demands more than we can handle, but is this true? You may say,

“Of course it’s true! After all, Paul writes in 1 Corinthians 10:13: ‘No temptation has overtaken you except what is common to us all. And God is faithful; he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear. But when you are tempted, he will also provide a way out so that you can endure it.’”
But note: the text does not say God give will never give us more than we are able to handle. It says he does not give us more than we can handle ON OUR OWN. How else will our need for God manifest unless we are at our wits end?

My experience has shown me time and again that …[ continue reading ]

To say Reading While Black by Esau McCaulley is large would be an understatement. No less than 10 days after its initial release (September 1, 2020) the publisher’s site notifies customers that shipments will be delayed due to high demand. The author has appeared on countless virtual interviews and is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times (see here). Already there have been numerous ratings given and reviews written;[ continue reading ]