What is the role of faith and reason in belief formation? Is there a difference between a preference, an opinion, and a belief? Is faith opposed to reason or does faith complement and work together with reason? First, faith is not fideism (a blind leap into the unknown; uncritical acceptanceRead More

For those culture warriors (think, “Wayne Grudem”) who argue against PC-versions of the Bible and insist ‘essentially literal’ is always a superior translation, check out “When evangelical snowflakes censor the Bible: The English Standard Version goes PC: How a Bible edition aimed at right-wing evangelicals has quietly scrubbed references to slaveryRead More

Craig A. Boyd & Kevin Timpe have provided an outstanding introduction to The Virtues in Oxford’s “Very Short Introductions” series. As with the other volumes, The Virtues is an excellent offering. It is clear and uncomplicated, thorough and inclusive in approach, and helpfully outlined and organized throughout.  Chapter 1 sets theRead More

History scholar Kristin Kobes Du Mez rehearses the ingredients of a distinctly American evangelical culture. Like it or not, these ingredients promote or facilitate nationalism, racism, sexism, white maleness, authority, and political power. She argues (convincingly) that a “militant white evangelicalism thrives on a sense of embattlement” (p xviii). ForRead More

Thomas Kuhn’s now classic The Structure of Scientific Revolutions opened my eyes to the importance of having my eyes open. It helped me appreciate that before science can advance or be changed for the better, the same data must be viewed from a different perspective. Tracing the history of science, KuhnRead More

One of the subscriptions I pay attention to from my inbox is The Worldview Bulletin Newsletter. The offerings are always thoughtful and stimulate me to see my faith from new and important angles as I seek to engage my world. The following article by Angus J. L. Menuge quickly gainedRead More

Practically every lady who has ever done a bible study has heard of Beth Moore. With the recent fallout on the departure from her Southern Baptist roots (check out her tweets from 4/7/2021), I’ve decided to read three books around this ongoing hot topic of gender roles in the home,Read More

Augustine, Confessions, Book 1, Chapter 1Thou awakest us to delight in Thy praise; for Thou madest us for Thyself, and our heart is restless, until it repose in Thee. Pascal, Pensées (425)“What is it, then, that this desire and this inability proclaim to us, but that there was once inRead More

In Matthew 22:36-39 Jesus tells us love is the highest duty of humankind. Love is human activity at its finest.

The command is the same in both cases: to love; but the recipients are different: “God” and “neighbor” (see Deuteronomy 6:5; Leviticus 19:18; and likely Luke 10:29-37 where “neighbor” extends to anyone in need). Since God is the greater of the two recipients (greater in every way morally, metaphysically, and conceptually), then it follows that he must receive more of our love. In fact, God must receive all of our love. Neighbors, however, are to receive at least as much as …Read More

Tish Harrison Warren offers important insight into what appears to be an inescapable predicament. Here’s the issue: In the throes of real pain and genuine suffering, we struggle to make sense out of the goodness of God (assuming there is some sense to be made under such pressure). This predicament favors no one and applies to everyone, whether …Read More

For some, saying “It’s in the hands of God” is kinda like saying I’m gonna dive into a pool with no water, then pray for rain.

My response to them is twofold: 1) Of course God’s got this, but 2) that does not preclude him using other means to heal, provide, fix, reconcile, et al. Ironically, failing to consider other means God may use suggests one does not actually trust God. You see, if God continues to care for creation providentially, then he may choose and most often does choose intermediary causes to bring about his good will for us. My experience shows me…Read More